Fired Works

14th Annual Fired Works
April 5-14, 2019

Featured Events

Friday, April 5
Fired Works Patron Party | 6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
Catered event featuring wine and live entertainment where attendees
have the first opportunity to view and purchase pottery.
$40 Advance Tickets. $50 Admission Day of Party.

Tuesday, April 9
Corks & Clay Workshop | 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. and 7:30 – 9:00 p.m.
Age 21+. $30 Admission. Come play in the mud. Drinks are on us.
Reservations required.

Thursday, April 11
Corks & Clay Workshop | 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. and 7:30 – 9:00 p.m.
Age 21+. $30 Admission. Come play in the mud. Drinks are on us.
Reservations required.

Saturday, April 6
Children’s Clay Time | 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. and 11:00 am –  12:00 p.m.
Ages 5-12. Free admission. Reservations required.

Wednesday, April 10
Wheel Turning | 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.
Age 18+. $50 admission. Give the wheel a whirl. Kiln time is on us. Reservations required. Note: wheel turning classes will be held at the 567 Center for Renewal Pottery Studio located on First Street in downtown Macon.

Saturday, April 13
Children’s Clay Time | 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. and 11:00 am –  12:00 p.m.
Ages 5-12. Free admission. Reservations required.

Saturday, April 13
Wheel Turning | 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Age 18+. $50 admission. Give the wheel a whirl. Kiln time is on us. Reservations required.
Note: wheel turning classes will be held at the 567 Center for Renewal Pottery Studio located on
First Street in downtown Macon.

Fired Works began as a local pottery show and has grown to become the largest exhibit of functional and sculptural pottery in the state of Georgia. The nine-day exhibit and sale includes special events such as Clay Workshops for Children, Corks and Clay Workshops for adults, demonstrations, and more.

A Special Preview Party kicks off on the Friday before Fired Works with live music, food, and a chance to purchase work before the exhibit opens to the general public. The mission of Fired Works is to provide a platform for artists and to promote the rich history of pottery in Central Georgia and support the work of the Macon Arts Alliance. People have made pottery along the banks of the Ocmulgee River for thousands of years and local potters and ceramic artists continue this tradition today.

Janet McGregor Dunn

Featured Artist Bio
Janet McGregor Dunn

While Janet McGregor Dunn has been dabbling with art since she could first hold a crayon, her first arts career began with a paintbrush in hand. She began her clay journey using wheels, but quickly moved to hand building.

McGregor Dunn combines her love of nature, music and color in each piece of pottery. Most of her pieces are hand-formed and all are one-of-a-kind. She brings the outdoors into some of her work, using straw, rocks, plants or other found objects from the woods surrounding her studio.

The initial creation of a piece might take days. After finishing a piece, it dries for a week or two, then is fired in an electric kiln for around 12 – 14 hours. It then sits and cools for roughly three days. All her clay pieces, whether functional or decorative, have multiple glazes and many have added glass. Each glaze firing takes anywhere from five to seven hours, with up to two days of cooling time before being removed from the kiln.

Dunn began selling her clay creations at art festivals and various galleries about nine years ago and has received numerous awards at shows through the years. Learn more about the artist at janetmcgregordunn.com.

Laura Cooper

Featured Artist Bio
Laura Cooper

Laura Cooper was born in South Georgia, reared all around the Peach State, and currently resides near Athens with her two amazing kids. Cooper began her studies of Fine Art at The Savannah College of Art and Design as a painter, but ten years later that she found clay. It has since been almost eight years since her initial introduction to the material and the prolific potter still finds herself consistently challenged and infatuated with the medium.

Cooper works as an independent artist and is a member of Long Road Studios, a collective of ceramic artists. Her current work is primarily focused on gestural interpretations of various types of vessels. Cooper’s interest in texture, repetition, subtleties, and creating a certain cadence allows her forms to be disciplined and organic. Cooper calls the irregularities that disrupt the form very fascinating and finds an alluring aesthetic value in imperfection and surfaces that seem a little worn.

To learn more about the artist or about Long Road Studios, visit longroadstudios.com.

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